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Starward commented on: No Poet Ought To Praise His Or Her Self by Starward 5 days 7 hours ago
Hey, Uncle, be more: Hey, Uncle, be more circumspect in what you say about a real Poet.  Pungus is more than a bystander, he is a real Poet. He has more artistry and poetic skill on his worst day than you will ever achieve in your entire lifetime.  So when you enter my comment section, restrict your comments to me and my poems, and do not even attempt to remark about the real Poets who might care to comment here.  
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Pungus commented on: SIMPLETON by Stephen 5 days 7 hours ago
It Can Never Be True: Let it be noted I am having a great revelation. You directed me by means of your advertising-comment, and reading the clarity conveyed is cool and all but wtf.
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Stephen commented on: No Poet Ought To Praise His Or Her Self by Starward 5 days 7 hours ago
The bystander eggs on the pugilists.: .
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Starward commented on: No Poet Ought To Praise His Or Her Self by Starward 5 days 7 hours ago
Thank you, sir, for your: Thank you, sir, for your perspective, which I always appreciate.
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Pungus commented on: No Poet Ought To Praise His Or Her Self by Starward 5 days 7 hours ago
I Am Hear: Painting eyeball portrait in fractal form, in which the theme is Presently dispayeld: A Reflection of Eathother's Staredown.   I am Certainly no scholar to see that nerves run high and Certainly not a Lady but My Lovely Lady approves.   It really is interdimensional stuff. Poets be merry! Poets suck a black cherry, and spit out the pit into the transhbin!
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Starward commented on: No Poet Ought To Praise His Or Her Self by Starward 5 days 8 hours ago
Since you have commented on: Since you have commented on my poem, I shall feel more free to respond than if I was visiting one of your poems.  And what I say is directed only toward your comment, and toward other items you have posted,  I know nothing of you beyond what is on this site.  In my opinion (and all of what I am about to write is strictly and entirely my own opinion), you seem to think that no poet can criticize the behavior of some other poet, while still being humble:  I suggest this shows a woeful disdain for or disregard of the Western canon, and of poets like Callimachus, Dante, Milton, Eliot, Pound Stevens; and, most especially, the great J. V. Cunningham---all of whom were humble men; but they were also, like you and me, fallible human beings.  This is a very solipsitic position to maintain.  I have also read poems of yours that criticize others' behavior that you dislike or with which you disagree (I would cite your poem "Judgment" among others as an example).  That poems of yours that I have cited does the very same thing that you criticize in others.  To critizie the behavior of others for critizing the behavior of others---is this not like the opitical illusion of mirrors reflecting mirrors, creating what seems an infinite number of reflections that just continue to some far away vanishing point?  (Are you familiar with Ashberry's "Self Portrait In A Convexy Mirror"?   Cunningham was a very humble man, they tell me (I did not ever have the opportunity to meet him, or to hear him lecture on poetry), but when he saw an abuse of poetry, he spoke up---and, I suggest, he thought pride was an abuse of poetry.  What about John Milton's verse play, Samson Agonistes, in which the character Harapha is Milton's very subtle attack upon the overweening pride of the scholar Claudius Salmasius?  And what of Milton's portrait of Satan in Paradise Lost?---is that a failure of Milton's Christian humbleness because he used that character as a parody of certain public and poetic behaviors that he found discourteous and uncouth?    However, I am grateful that you visited the poem and commented.  I have been candid because you came to my comment area; like I said, if I visit yours, I try to be more circumspect.  But here, I will respond as appears, to me, to be a fit and fair reply.  (By the way, you ought to check out David Lean's film, Doctor Zhivago, specifically the character Strelnikov's comments about Zhivago's poetry.  When I saw the film, this past Saturday, I thought of you when I heard Strelnikov make those remarks.  I did not imagine, then, that you would favor me with a comment, as you have done today.)  Thanks again for that, Uncle.  Feel free to visit any poem, at any time.  [*/+/^]
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Stephen commented on: No Poet Ought To Praise His Or Her Self by Starward 5 days 10 hours ago
This poem is of course about the need for humilty.: C.S. Lewis said: “Do not imagine that if you meet a really humble man he will be what most people call 'humble' nowadays: he will not be a sort of greasy, smarmy person, who is always telling you that, of course, he is nobody. Probably all you will think about him is that he seemed a cheerful, intelligent chap who took a real interest in what you said to him. If you do dislike him it will be because you feel a little envious of anyone who seems to enjoy life so easily. He will not be thinking about humility: he will not be thinking about himself at all.”  This humble man would also of course never write a poem taking someone else to task for being prideful.
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Starward commented on: No Poet Ought To Praise His Or Her Self by Starward 5 days 10 hours ago
Thank you, sir, for reminding: Thank you, sir, for reminding me of that.
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Pungus commented on: No Poet Ought To Praise His Or Her Self by Starward 5 days 11 hours ago
The Game is Played: Guilty as a cannibal in court. Eliot says, "Humility is endless." And yes it's an acquired taste.  
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Pungus commented on: Accustomed by Pungus 5 days 11 hours ago
Furthermore: This poem went on the Refrigerator for my mom to see. I am glad that it was emotionally forthright and effective. We reminisced and pondered our struggles together.
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Pungus commented on: Pillow Plants by Pungus 5 days 11 hours ago
French Toast : Yes. I trust, admire and appreciate you (both) greatly.
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Starward commented on: Pillow Plants by Pungus 5 days 11 hours ago
Thank you, Patricia, for the: Thank you, Patricia, for the kind compliment.
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Starward commented on: An Arbor by allets 5 days 11 hours ago
Like the greatest of the: Like the greatest of the Hellenistic poets, who compressed great poetic subjects into brief epigrams and such, you use your poem's brevity very adroitly to describe one of nature's complicated and beautiful processes.  I applaud the classic talent that this poem demonstrates.  Some more, please . . .
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Starward commented on: Nucleus by patriciajj 5 days 12 hours ago
A poem posted by this Poet is: A poem posted by this Poet is always an Event worth noting; in fact, it is a double event---both the posting of the individual poem, and the expansion of her collection of greatess.     In a book of essays (on Wallace Stevens' poetry) entitled Words Written Out Of Desire, the superb critic and explicator, Helen Vendler, has suggested that Wallace Stevens always situated the point, or crux, or main subject a poem in its center.  I believe that this also applies to the poem Patricia has just posted (and I think that most of the centers of gravity, as I have called them, are similarly placed).  This poem's center of gravity is the stanza that beings with "Listen. you've glimpsed it too."  This stanza is discloses not only the poem's process, but the fact that are overhearing a conversation---she is directly addressing the reader, in a conversationl tone, and admitting the reader to the internal processes of her poem and, by implication (I think), the internal processes of her entire collection.      I believe Vendler also pointed out that, in Stevens' poems, a set of internal connections and references brought the poems into relationships with each other---and this, also, is a feature of Patriciajj's poems.  Stars create light and warmth by the fusion of atomic particles:  a controlled collision of elements within their cores.  A star is a body of plasma which retains its shape and integral form through the perfect balance of two forces:  the downward pressure of gravity, and the upward pressure of the energy released by the fusion.  Patricia's poems also operate in this way, if I may extend the metaphor:  there is a pressure of what the Poet's need to express an emotion, or an insight, or an opinion; and there is the opposite pressure of the energy released by the fusion of each poem's internal elements, and from this fusion the poem's vivifying light and warmth proceed.  I am not saying this to simply praise the Poet, because, frankly, her greatness is so far above my praise and does not need it.  I am saying this, and all the other comments I have made or will make on her poems, to two sets of readers:  those members and guests of postpoems who read this, and those graduate students (in a future I may not live to see) who will be diligently studying her poetry (and some with an eye to writing graduate dissertations).  Reader, do not smirk:  this is going to happen; and, since I will not be an active part of it, I want to leave my mark, like Robert Peary's steel spike in the North Pole Ice; so here, just to be whimsical, it is:  [*/+/].  There will be more precise observations and greater insights than I can provide; but I will have been here "afore 'em," to paraphrase an old Scottish song.   Is it an event, the posting of this poem, or of any of her poems?  Of course it is.  In closing, I shall describe it in a metaphor from the month of July, a month that has been of supreme significance to me, personally, since the early seventies.  Many poets are like people setting off fireworks on the Fourth of July:  sparklers, noise-makers, flashes of light in the local heights just above us.  But Patricia's poems are not like those.  Patricia's poems are like the stars that rise into the sky on the night of the Fourth of July, or any other night; beside which so many other poets'efforts are  flashes in the pan, on the surface, like the glows and glimmers of fireflies, signalling the presence of high summer before they die in the chill of autumn.  Patricia's poems are above, beyond, this.  Like the stars, her poems mark the seasons of our lives and our emotions, but are not affected or limited by those seasons.  It is a privilege to watch this happen, in each of the events of her poems' postings.  It is also a privilege to be able to comment on such greatness as it procedes and constellates itself before our eyes.
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Starward commented on: @ 27.105 MHz: Brief Elegy For A Young Man, Slain For The Way He Loved by Starward 5 days 12 hours ago
Thank you for understanding,: Thank you for understanding, and for explicating the purpose of this poem.  It came to me in a flurry, and while I thought to make it a Tanka sequence, it chose, instead, the other format I have used from time to time.  This poem, after it formed in my mind, was very insistent on being written (and in my hurry to accede to its insistence, I mistyped the geographical references, which I have corrected)---and I truly believe that your comment has expressed the reason for the poem's insistence on being brought on to postpoems.  Thank you for always going to the crux of those of my poems on which you comment:  to receive such comments from a Poet of your creative stature as well as exquisite compehension of life and life's issues is a privilege for which I will never cease to be grateful.
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