LAUGHING STOCK

Folder: 
RANTS & CHANTS

 

I run into a former co-worker

& we talk a bit about life.

He’s split from his wife

and lost his house.

 

Damn, it’s been awhile

I think to myself

& then he asks me

if I’m still writing

for the wrestling magazine.

 

Let’s open a can of worms.

I had forgotten, quite gratefully,

about all that shit.

 

I used to be a correspondent

for a wrestling magazine.

I’d write results

From the cards I attended.

 

But, of course,

I’m now a serious literary writer.

I need to suppress info like that.

I wouldn’t want it 

getting out and becoming known.

 

I’ll be the laughing stock

of the literary world.

People will be like,

“Pssst, see that guy?

He wrote for a wrestling rag.”

 

I’d have to hang 

my head in shame.

I’d have an uphill battle 

to regain the respect of my peers.

 

I’m not sure why it matters

but no doubt it does.

I’ll be paying hush money

to keep this thing quiet.

 

Oh, how the follies of youth

come roaring back 

to haunt us later in life.

 

 

 

Author's Notes/Comments: 

An old poem about an even older forgotten time in my life

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georgeschaefer's picture

less exciting than you

less exciting than you think.  A wrestling magazine started a weekly (or was it bi-weekly) newsletter to provide updates on wrestling cards from around the country.  Whenever I went to card in Philly, Jersey or New York City, I would take notes and jot down the results.  I would send them in so they could publish the results.  This was obviously before the internet went and ruined everything.

allets's picture

To Publish

Makes you an authority - what/where, no matter - it was the oportunity at the time. Writing down experiences - I try to avoid those but they creep in anyway. Solid write - liked the call for secrecy. :D



Onyamaichi

 

georgeschaefer's picture

I didn't get paid but I got

I didn't get paid but I got free copies of the newsletter.  I think they also threw me a few free magazines in the mix.  I also wrote concert reviews for a now defunct rag called Plastic Fantastic Voyage.  Again, it was an unpaid gig but it was still a lot of fun.