Realm of Robots

 

Believe the realm of robots

is a perfect reality, mimicking

friends in the mirror of self


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lyrycsyntyme's picture

If I understand this right, I

If I understand this right, I would say that we are focusing on the shallow definitions of 'diversity', and simultaneously abandoning the deeper, most meaningful ones. In time, I imagine we will abandon most of the shallower definitions, as well.

Pungus's picture

Judging from your comments,

Judging from your comments, you seem to recognize destiny as either an abyss of nothingness, else maintaining the mundane world of our observances. I don't know, but you may inform me whether I am in tune with you. And honestly I am struggling to grasp the relevance of your comment with the poem; but I appreciate your perspective nonetheless. You have an interesting intelligence. But wait, you are delving into future possibilities no? The robots becoming a new symbol for our ancient angels. Sorey. Language can prove especially difficult sometimes.

lyrycsyntyme's picture

Interesting, and much to chew

Interesting, and much to chew on.

 

I was indeed taking a look at your words through a lens of the present and future, even while taking the robots as carrying on as symbolism. A funny thing about poetry - it often filters through where our eyes are fixated, I suppose. But I'd also add, and perhaps this jives more with your intended message, that I would not declare our present and future behaviors as being new - they are similar to those of our 'ancient angels'. It's merely that our surrounding advancements have altered the degree of magnification of the effect of our actions. Perhaps I'm still off base? Regardless, it captured my interest, even if my interest got lost in the woods somewhere :)

 

Meanwhile, I'm fascinating by your intepretation of my personal philosophy. Particularly because you're not the first person to have shared this type of take with me. I wouldn't quite describe myself that way, which nudges me to wonder whether I might need to significantly improve either (a) my ability to express my viewpoint or (b) my own self-understanding. If I understand myself, as I hope I do, I'd describe my philosophy in regards to human destiny as there not being a specific one for us, but neither that this all leads to an abyss of nothingness, either. I might say that the human existence on the Earth will ultimately lead to an abyss of nothingness, as that seems ultimately inevitable in the scientific sense, even if we can ever find a way to become more than we currently are as a group of societies. But I imagine that in other planes of existence we will carry on. It's possible that some of us will be lost for ever, in that abyss you mention, as I see no guarantee that we'll figure out in some other life/plane of existence what we can't figure out here. But who knows :)

 

 

Pungus's picture

Methinks you express yourself

Methinks you express yourself as perfectly as your brilliance allows. I note this because oftentimes I too find myself groping for words that might not exist, and even hieroglyphics would seem to have better capacity to realizing great answers. I believe the secret is eternal, which no language can unveil -- yet we still have an innate, intuitive knowledge of the streaming source of our lives. 

.

"advancements have altered the degree of magnification of the effect of our actions" strikes me good, and is a principle I share but have never been able to articulate as well as you've just done. A perpetually changing singularity no? Also I really love your thesis on life and death: we believe death may bring us to absolute nothingness, but eternity is another principle to consider -- and that eternity would present to us, after death of worldly dimensions, to something entirely new and inconceivable, again and again.

lyrycsyntyme's picture

Thank you. I appreciate your

Thank you. I appreciate your understanding. I also greatly appreciate your injection of 'hieroglyphics' to make your point. It reminds me of my childhood fascination with them. A strange desire, I had, not to understand other languages that are more practical - that many millions or even a billion people speak - but to look into those that seemed (or were quite matter-of-factly) lost. Maybe it was just the thirst of imagination looking for another secret decoder ring outside of the box of cereal, but perhaps it was something more. Maybe it was the early stages of a non-terminal quest to find some eternal secrets. I've always been better at identifying what's missing (or at least that something is missing), than what is already there. Hmmm.

 

I am also on board with an acknowledgement of a "perpetually changing singularity". I think, in my way, that has been one thing I've tried to address (and better understand) in my writings within "Commentary on Apocolypses". As of course has been thoroughly documented, every era seems to sense that the end of near, yet here we are, many eras after that notion was first popularized. But I do have to nod to the unique and growing ability we have today to completely - literally - change what it means to exist in human form and to communicate with each other (or not). Might we alter our fleshy vessels to the point where they cannot hope to take us to our next destination with anything gained? Or even at all? I wonder.

 

 

 

 

Januarian's picture

On the first reading, it

On the first reading, it rings like science fiction; on the second, like profound philosophy.


Januarian

[* /+/ ^]

Pungus's picture

I wasn't expecting anybody to

I wasn't expecting anybody to comprehend this poem, even enough to call it what it is "profound philosophy" because I thought it would appear as gibberish to the audience. Thank you for your intellectual perseverance, and especially for your comment.

Januarian's picture

It is not gibberish to

It is not gibberish to discerning eyes.


Januarian

[* /+/ ^]